Climate Action Tracker

An independent science-based assessment tracking all countries‘ emission reduction pledges and their implementation. CAT assessments are regarded as the thermometer of international climate action ambition.

Contact
Dr. Marcia Rocha

Thermometer shows the global-mean temperature increase above pre-industrial by 2100, with an uncertainty range originating from carbon-cycle and climate modelling.
Thermometer shows the global-mean temperature increase above pre-industrial by 2100, with an uncertainty range originating from carbon-cycle and climate modelling.

Independent Scientific Analysis

The Climate Action Tracker (CAT) is an independent scientific analysis that measures government climate action against the globally agreed aim of holding warming below 2°C of warming. It is produced by four research organisations: Climate Analytics, Ecofys, NewClimate Institute and Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research.
The Climate Action Tracker tracks the actions of 30 selected countries, all the biggest emitters and a representative sample of smaller emitters, focusing on:

  • Government climate action pledged to the UNFCCC (and INDCs, other commitments)
  • The policies a government has actually implemented to meet its commitments
  • Whether a government is doing its “fair share” compared with others
  • Comparison to emission reduction potential based on a literature review
  • Comparison of national and sectoral decarbonisation indicators

Individual country assessments, briefings and updates are available www.climateactiontracker.org

Latest

The last gasoline-powered car will have to be sold by about 2035 to put the world on track to limit global warming to the most stringent goal set by world leaders last year, according to a Climate Action Tracker report.  
Zero-emission vehicles need to reach a dominant market share by around 2035 for the world to meet the Paris Agreement’s lower warming limit of 1.5°C—and even that could be too late to avoid the need for significant negative emissions, according to new analysis by the Climate Action Tracker. This transformation of the passenger transport sector would also have to be accompanied by a decarbonisation of the power sector to ensure the electric vehicles (EV) are truly emissions free.  

Publications

The Climate Action Tracker’s analysis released during COP21 in Paris finds that if all coal plants in the pipeline were to be built, by 2030, emissions from coal power would be 400% higher than what is consistent with a 2°C pathway. Even with no new construction, in 2030, emissions from coal-fired power generation would still be more than 150% higher than what is consistent with holding warming below 2°C.  
The Climate Action Tracker’s assessment of Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC) submitted to the UNFCCC ahead of the October 1 deadline, which finds that, if these climate plans were to be fully implemented, they would bring the projected warming to 2.7°C – an improvement of 0.4˚C since the last assessment of pledges at the Lima talks in December 2014.  
On 11 August 2015, Australia submitted its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC). The Climate Action Tracker rates Australia’s INDC 2030 target to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 26–28% from 2005 levels including land-use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) by 2030 as “inadequate.” After accounting for LULUCF, this target is equivalent to a range of around 5% below to 5% above 1990 levels of GHG emissions excluding LULUCF in the year 2030.  
Climate Action Tracker’s analysis looking at the combined INDCs of all G7 governments and the EU, who are responsible, in aggregate, for around 30% of global greenhouse gas emissions and 40% of global GDP, ahead of the 2015 G7 meeting in Germany. The combined climate plans for the G7 and EU have made a small step towards the right track to hold warming to 2°C, but there is still a substantial emissions gap.  
This Climate Action Tracker Update describes a new method to assess “comparable efforts” and the “fair share” of governments’ national greenhouse gas reduction proposals. Such a comparison is essential for the successful completion of an agreement on climate change in Paris in December this year, as some governments have made their offers conditional on comparable action by others.  

Projects

The "Climate Action Tracker" is an independent science-based assessment, which tracks the emission commitments and actions of countries.