Decarbonising South and South East Asia

South and South East Asia’s growing economies can shift from their current carbon-intensive pathways to renewable energy to fuel economic growth, boost sustainable development and overcome energy poverty while avoiding life-threatening pollution and environmental degradation, according to a new Climate Analytics report.

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Smog in Pakistan's capital, Karachi, which is world's sixth-most-populous city with a population of over 14 million. 
Transitioning to zero-carbon energy would bring South and South East Asian countries huge benefits, including reducing deaths related to air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels. ©Jose Sa via Flickr CC BY 2.0
Smog in Pakistan's capital, Karachi, which is world's sixth-most-populous city with a population of over 14 million. Transitioning to zero-carbon energy would bring South and South East Asian countries huge benefits, including reducing deaths related to air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels. ©Jose Sa via Flickr CC BY 2.0

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More persistent heat, drought and rain in a warming world - study

More persistent heat, drought and rain in a warming world - study

Europe, North America and parts of Asia can expect not just more intense but also longer lasting periods of heat, drought and rain during summer as the planet warms, worsening impacts on health and agriculture, according to a study led by researchers from Climate Analytics and Humboldt University of Berlin.
19 August 2019

Briefings

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Coal Phase Out

Coal is the most carbon intensive fossil fuel and phasing it out is a key step to achieve the emissions reductions needed to limit global warming to 1.5°C, as enshrined in the Paris Agreement. Our research shows that the EU and OECD countries must stop burning coal for electricity by 2030, China by 2040 and the rest of the world by mid-century in order to meet commitments made in Paris in the most cost effective manner.

1.5°C - key facts

Since 2009 over a hundred Small Island Developing States, Least Developed Countries and many others have been calling for limiting global temperature rise to below 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. Placing the 1.5°C limit alongside the legally binding goal to hold global temperatures “well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels” in the Paris Agreement was a major victory for vulnerable countries. This page is an information pool for material around the 1.5°C temperature limit.

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ONLINE TOOL: Costs of inaction

The current round of national emission reduction pledges will lead to about 3°C of warming by the end of the century. This tool shows the additional economic damages Small Island Developing States and Least Developed Countries face in a 3°C world compared with 1.5°C, the limit set out in the Paris Agreement.

Events

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26/09/2019
From the smallest islands to the highest peaks – oceans, ice and climate change

Following closely the release of the IPCC special report on oceans and ice, this event during Climate Week NYC will outline its main findings and - together with representatives of Small Island Developing States and Least Developed Countries - discuss the implications for vulnerable countries.  

26 September 2019, 9-11am
Scandinavia House, 58 Park Ave, New York, NY 10016

How extreme weather conditions could last longer due to climate change

Global warming will make persistent extreme weather more likely – including longer heatwaves, droughts and extended rainy periods. This effect comes on top of the increase in average temperatures - authors explain a recent study published in journal Nature Climate Change.  
19 August 2019

Carbon tax in schools: a laboratory for change

Over two million school kids from 135 countries have participated in the climate strikes this year. The "Fridays for future" movement, initiated by climate activist Greta Thunberg, has boosted discussions on which policy tools can have a tangible effect in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. One of these tools is putting a price on carbon.  
16 July 2019

Media coverage

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Climate change will drive longer extreme heatwaves in summer

Climate change will drive longer extreme heatwaves in summer New Scientist

Summer extremes of heat and rain are likely to last longer in Europe, North America and Asia if the world warms by more than 2°C, with serious effects for agriculture and human health. Climate change is expected to bring more frequent and intense extreme weather events. But how persistent those episodes will be, such as the European summer heatwave in 2018, is not so well understood.

19 August 2019

Publications

Australia’s share of global CO2 emissions from domestic use of fossil fuels was about 1.4% in 2017. Accounting for fossil fuel exports lifts Australia’s global carbon footprint to about 5%. This is equivalent to the total emissions of Russia, which is ranked the fifth biggest CO2 emitter globally. If current government and industry projections for fossil fuel exports are realised, Australia could be responsible for about 13% of Paris Agreement- compatible global CO2 emissions in 2030.  
Shifting energy supply in South Asia and South East Asia to non-fossil fuel-based energy systems in line with the Paris Agreement long-term temperature goal and achievement of Sustainable Development Goals