Decarbonising South and South East Asia

South and South East Asia’s growing economies can shift from their current carbon-intensive pathways to renewable energy to fuel economic growth, boost sustainable development and overcome energy poverty while avoiding life-threatening pollution and environmental degradation, according to a new Climate Analytics report.

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Smog in Pakistan's capital, Karachi, which is world's sixth-most-populous city with a population of over 14 million. 
Transitioning to zero-carbon energy would bring South and South East Asian countries huge benefits, including reducing deaths related to air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels. ©Jose Sa via Flickr CC BY 2.0
Smog in Pakistan's capital, Karachi, which is world's sixth-most-populous city with a population of over 14 million. Transitioning to zero-carbon energy would bring South and South East Asian countries huge benefits, including reducing deaths related to air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels. ©Jose Sa via Flickr CC BY 2.0

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South and South East Asia can power ahead with renewables: report

South and South East Asia can power ahead with renewables: report

South and South East Asia’s (1) growing economies can shift from their current carbon-intensive pathways to renewable energy to fuel economic growth, boost sustainable development and overcome energy poverty while avoiding life-threatening pollution and environmental degradation, according to a new report by the research institute Climate Analytics, released at the Bonn climate talks today.
20 June 2019

Briefings

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Coal Phase Out

Coal is the most carbon intensive fossil fuel and phasing it out is a key step to achieve the emissions reductions needed to limit global warming to 1.5°C, as enshrined in the Paris Agreement. Our research shows that the EU and OECD countries must stop burning coal for electricity by 2030, China by 2040 and the rest of the world by mid-century in order to meet commitments made in Paris in the most cost effective manner.

1.5°C - key facts

Since 2009 over a hundred Small Island Developing States, Least Developed Countries and many others have been calling for limiting global temperature rise to below 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. Placing the 1.5°C limit alongside the legally binding goal to hold global temperatures “well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels” in the Paris Agreement was a major victory for vulnerable countries. This page is an information pool for material around the 1.5°C temperature limit.

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ONLINE TOOL: Costs of inaction

The current round of national emission reduction pledges will lead to about 3°C of warming by the end of the century. This tool shows the additional economic damages Small Island Developing States and Least Developed Countries face in a 3°C world compared with 1.5°C, the limit set out in the Paris Agreement.

Resource page

Loss and Damage

Loss and Damage refers to the impacts of climate change that can no longer be avoided through adaptation or mitigation. It is one of the key issues for vulnerable countries, who have contributed the least to climate change.

They call on the developed world to provide support to cope with Loss and Damage, which otherwise threatens their economies, cultures and the lives of their people.

This page provides background material and key resources, including scientific studies and briefing material and blogs with updates on the policy process under the UNFCCC and under the IPCC.

Carbon tax in schools: a laboratory for change

Over two million school kids from 135 countries have participated in the climate strikes this year. The "Fridays for future" movement, initiated by climate activist Greta Thunberg, has boosted discussions on which policy tools can have a tangible effect in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. One of these tools is putting a price on carbon.  
16 July 2019

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Renewables the only way to go

Renewables the only way to goThe Third Pole

Countries in South and South East Asia will need to urgently consider how to reverse their current trend of expanding coal-fired generation capacity and how to implement policies to enable a fast decarbonisation of the electricity mix, phasing out coal for power generation by 2040, says global think tank Climate Analytics.

03 July 2019

Publications

Australia’s share of global CO2 emissions from domestic use of fossil fuels was about 1.4% in 2017. Accounting for fossil fuel exports lifts Australia’s global carbon footprint to about 5%. This is equivalent to the total emissions of Russia, which is ranked the fifth biggest CO2 emitter globally. If current government and industry projections for fossil fuel exports are realised, Australia could be responsible for about 13% of Paris Agreement- compatible global CO2 emissions in 2030.  
Shifting energy supply in South Asia and South East Asia to non-fossil fuel-based energy systems in line with the Paris Agreement long-term temperature goal and achievement of Sustainable Development Goals