Decarbonising South and South East Asia

South and South East Asia’s growing economies can shift from their current carbon-intensive pathways to renewable energy to fuel economic growth, boost sustainable development and overcome energy poverty while avoiding life-threatening pollution and environmental degradation, according to a new Climate Analytics report.

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Smog in Pakistan's capital, Karachi, which is world's sixth-most-populous city with a population of over 14 million. 
Transitioning to zero-carbon energy would bring South and South East Asian countries huge benefits, including reducing deaths related to air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels. ©Jose Sa via Flickr CC BY 2.0
Smog in Pakistan's capital, Karachi, which is world's sixth-most-populous city with a population of over 14 million. Transitioning to zero-carbon energy would bring South and South East Asian countries huge benefits, including reducing deaths related to air pollution caused by burning fossil fuels. ©Jose Sa via Flickr CC BY 2.0

Latest

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Coal exit by 2040 to keep climate goals within reach - report

Coal exit by 2040 to keep climate goals within reach - report

Governments need to ensure that global carbon emissions from coal-fired power stations peak next year, and that they eliminate coal from electricity generation by 2040 in order to keep climate change within the internationally agreed limits, according to a new report from Climate Analytics released for the UN Secretary-General's Climate Action Summit in New York.
23 September 2019
More persistent heat, drought and rain in a warming world - study

More persistent heat, drought and rain in a warming world - study

Europe, North America and parts of Asia can expect not just more intense but also longer lasting periods of heat, drought and rain during summer as the planet warms, worsening impacts on health and agriculture, according to a study led by researchers from Climate Analytics and Humboldt University of Berlin.
19 August 2019

Briefings

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Coal Phase Out

Coal is the most carbon intensive fossil fuel and phasing it out is a key step to achieve the emissions reductions needed to limit global warming to 1.5°C, as enshrined in the Paris Agreement. Most emissions from coal are in the electricity sector and, as we already have the technologies that can replace coal, phase out is a relatively cheap and easy option to reduce emissions. Our research shows coal needs to be phased out globally by 2040 to meet the commitments made in Paris.

1.5°C - key facts

Since 2009 over a hundred Small Island Developing States, Least Developed Countries and many others have been calling for limiting global temperature rise to below 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. Placing the 1.5°C limit alongside the legally binding goal to hold global temperatures “well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels” in the Paris Agreement was a major victory for vulnerable countries. This page is an information pool for material around the 1.5°C temperature limit.

Featuring

ONLINE TOOL: The Lowdown on Coal

Phasing out coal is a crucial step in fighting climate change. We have a new interactive tool that shows you current and planned coal power around the world, as well as the amount of current and future carbon pollution from these plants.
Find out how well your country is doing on quitting coal.

Events

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25/10/2019
Transport and buildings emissions in 2030: Where would best practices take us and where do we need to be?

This event in Berlin will present the quantitative results of an analysis conducted by Climate Analytics as part of the CEE Climate Policy Frontier project focusing on emissions reductions in the transport and building sectors in six Central and Eastern European countries: Bulgaria, Czechia, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. For each of the countries and sectors, the team will present three sets of emissions pathways.  

25 October 2019, 9:00am–16:30pm, Kastanienallee 82, 10435 Berlin, Germany

Not even the bare minimum: unpacking Germany's 2030 climate package

On 20 September, the same day that more than 1.4 million German citizens took to the streets, joining millions more around the world to demand action on climate change, the German government released its long-awaited climate package. It is nowhere near ambitious enough to meet the objective of the Paris Agreement to limit warming to 1.5°C.  
11 October 2019

Troubled land: a call for sustainable land use and rapid climate action

The IPCC’s latest report provides a stark reminder that climate change places the life support systems that land provides at risk. For vulnerable countries in particular, there is no sustainable future without sustainable land use combined with rapid climate action.  
28 August 2019

Media coverage

All Media coverage
Revealed: northern Australia's fossil fuel plans push climate goals beyond reach

Revealed: northern Australia's fossil fuel plans push climate goals beyond reachThe Guardian

A wave of planned fossil fuel developments by major companies across northern Australia would significantly increase the amount of coal and gas the country plans to sell into Asia and push the Paris climate agreement goals further beyond reach, a Guardian analysis reveals. If the proposals go ahead, the science and policy institute Climate Analytics estimates that by 2030 Australia, with 0.3% of the global population, will be linked to about 13% of the greenhouse gases that can be emitted if the world is to meet the goals set in Paris.

09 October 2019

World’s coal emissions ‘must peak in 2020 to keep climate change in check’

World’s coal emissions ‘must peak in 2020 to keep climate change in check’Energy Live News

The world’s coal emissions must peak in 2020 to keep the rate of climate change in check. That’s the warning offered in a new report published by Climate Analytics, which says it is up to governments to ensure this is the case and stresses the polluting fossil fuel must be cut from global electricity generation entirely by 2040 in order to avoid breaking international obligations such as the Paris Agreement.

23 September 2019

Publications

This report shows how fast coal needs to be phased out in order to meet the objectives of the Paris Agreement, in light of the latest science from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). It also assesses whether the efforts to reduce coal use in electricity generation since the adoption of the Paris Agreement put as any closer to a pathway consistent with its 1.5°C limit.  
Our Annual Report looks back at how our work reflected and fed into the global priorities in 2018 in areas of advancing climate science around the 1.5°C limit in the Paris Agreement, global decarbonisation, international climate negotiations and implementing climate action in vulnerable countries.