Latest

Finland and the European Union need to strengthen their climate pledges, rapidly cut emissions and speed up introducing renewables into the energy mix to be in line with the 1.5°C warming limit in the Paris Agreement, according to a new report.  
Join us for this event in New York on 21 April - on the eve of the Signing Ceremony of the Paris Agreement, our experts will present their analysis of the delicately balanced global climate deal and the next steps for its entry into force and implementation. They will also clarify the latest climate science, assess the emission reduction pledges to date and debate how the world can adopt pathways consistent with the agreement to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C.  
European researchers have found substantially different climate change impacts for a global warming of 1.5°C and 2°C by 2100. The additional 0.5°C would mean a 10-cm-higher global sea-level rise by 2100, longer heat waves, and would result in virtually all tropical coral reefs being at risk. The research is published today (21 April) in Earth System Dynamics, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU), and is presented at the EGU General Assembly.  
A new paper in Nature Climate Change, co-authored by Dr. Michiel Schaeffer of Climate Analytics, assesses the differences between various carbon budget estimates from IPCC and other sources, and identifies the most appropriate carbon budget for holding warming below 2°C.  
Climate Analytics event focusing of some of the key issues for vulnerable countries following the adoption of the Paris Agreement, an exploration of what the 1.5°C temperature limit means for European climate policy and steps in the implementation of the agreement.  
Our side event at COP21 on 4 Dec 2015 focuses on data and values, science, politics and mechanisms relating to the ambition and impact of INDCs and the new climate agreement. The event is a collaboration with PBL and TERI.  

Publications

The latest in UNEP’s Adaptation Gap Report series looks at the difference between adaptation costs in developing countries and funds currently available - the 'adaptation finance gap'. The report identifies trends and highlights challenges associated with measuring progress towards fulfilling the adaptation finance gap, while informing national and international efforts to advance adaptation. It analyses the ‘adaptation finance gap’ against the background of the provisions laid out in the Paris Agreement, and benefits from the insights included in the INDCs.