Climate Finance

Public and private climate finance is a central means of implementation for ambitious adaptation and mitigation options. Through our interdisciplinary approach linking science and policy elements we assist stakeholders in developing successful strategies to shift investments towards sustainable development in line with internationally agreed temperature goals.
As part of our negotiation support we assist vulnerable countries in their efforts to implement innovative and transformative approaches for an institutional architecture that is responsive to their needs and circumstances.

 ©Felix Fallasch / Copyright
©Felix Fallasch / Copyright

Assessment of Climate Finance needs

We provide assessments of developing countries’ finance needs to adapt to a warmer world and explore the effects of different temperature scenarios on these needs. Our expertise also includes the identification of new sources and policy mechanisms to generate additional resources to match the needs of developing countries.

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Publications

Produced in collaboration with the African Climate Finance Hub, the report says deep global emissions reductions are the best way to head off Africa’s crippling adaptation costs. It also finds that the continent’s domestic resources are insufficient to respond to projected impacts, but would be important to complement international funding for African countries – including meeting the Cancun climate finance commitments by 2020. The report also explores the extent to which African nations can contribute to closing the adaptation gap – especially in the area of identifying the resources that will be needed.  
The first UNEPAdaptation Gap Report serves as a preliminary assessment of global adaptation gaps in finance, technology and knowledge, and lays out a framework for future work on better defining and bridging these gaps.  
Africa is anticipated to be confronted with the severest adverse effects of human-induced climate change, compared to most other regions of the world, due to a combination of particularly severe projected impacts and relatively low adaptive capacity (e.g. IPCC AR4, World Bank 2013). The need for adaptation is expected to be high in Africa, especially in light of the existing deficit in adaptation to current climate variability and climate change. However, under any scenario of global mitigation and strong regional adaptation efforts, considerable adverse effects of climate change on Africa will remain, resulting in loss and damage.  

Projects