Climate Action Tracker

An independent science-based assessment tracking all countries‘ emission reduction pledges and their implementation. CAT assessments are regarded as the thermometer of international climate action ambition.

Latest

Which country is making more progress in decarbonising their road transport sector with low-carbon fuels? Which country has a higher share of renewable energy? How does this look for countries without a large share of hydropower? All of these questions, and many others, can now be answered through the Climate Action Tracker’s new interactive decarbonisation data portal, launched today.  
A video made by the World Economic Forum, showing what we need to do in the next decade to slow global warming. It is based on the recent Climate Action Tracker report, which outlines the ten most important short-term steps to limit warming to 1.5°C .  

Publications

The Climate Action Tracker’s analysis released during COP21 in Paris finds that if all coal plants in the pipeline were to be built, by 2030, emissions from coal power would be 400% higher than what is consistent with a 2°C pathway. Even with no new construction, in 2030, emissions from coal-fired power generation would still be more than 150% higher than what is consistent with holding warming below 2°C.  
The Climate Action Tracker’s assessment of Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC) submitted to the UNFCCC ahead of the October 1 deadline, which finds that, if these climate plans were to be fully implemented, they would bring the projected warming to 2.7°C – an improvement of 0.4˚C since the last assessment of pledges at the Lima talks in December 2014.  
On 11 August 2015, Australia submitted its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC). The Climate Action Tracker rates Australia’s INDC 2030 target to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 26–28% from 2005 levels including land-use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) by 2030 as “inadequate.” After accounting for LULUCF, this target is equivalent to a range of around 5% below to 5% above 1990 levels of GHG emissions excluding LULUCF in the year 2030.  
This Climate Action Tracker Update describes a new method to assess “comparable efforts” and the “fair share” of governments’ national greenhouse gas reduction proposals. Such a comparison is essential for the successful completion of an agreement on climate change in Paris in December this year, as some governments have made their offers conditional on comparable action by others.